Archive for the ‘Weather’ Category

In view of the recent weather this information from Derbyshire County Council may be of interest –

At the Liaison meeting scheduled for Monday 30th March 2020, commencing at 6pm, at County Hall, Matlock, the Economy, Transport and Environment Department will be presenting information on the subject of flooding.

The council would like to draw your attention to the information currently available on our website Reporting flooding

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Wet, Wet, Wet

Thanks to Richard T for some of these photos

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Managing Flood Water

The Parish Council has sent us the following useful information-

The recent rain and flow from springs has prompted the Parish Council to review the measures in place to manage the risk of flooding in the village.

Our lead flood authority is Derbyshire County Council and reports of flooding problems can be made to them here. Reporting flooding emergencies.

 

Useful information is also available available on the Parish Council’s own website here. Advice on flooding. This includes the availability of sand bags in the village.

 

Finally, like Derbyshire County Council, the Parish Council would like to take the opportunity to remind all land and property owners with watercourses of their responsibility for keeping them clear enough to allow the free flow of water. Watercourses include man made ditches as well as natural brooks and streams. Debris can be removed and bank vegetation cut back, but the watercourse should not be altered. If there is a watercourse on the boundary of your property you are responsible up to the middle of it. For more in formation see the government site Owning a watercourse.

 

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Flooding – ‘live’ map

Following the recent flooding and disruption in Derbyshire you may be interested in the website below, which provides “live” updates of the latest river and groundwater flow and levels across the UK.

 https://www.gaugemap.co.uk/#!Map

 

 

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Flood Alert

A Flood Alert has been issued by the Environment Agency.

Flood Alert in force: Upper Dove.

Flooding is possible for: Low-lying land and roads between Izaak Walton and Rocester on the River Dove and between Carsington Dam and Mayfield on the Henmore Brook.

Be prepared.

Heavy rain is forecast in the River Dove catchment overnight (Thursday the twentieth of September). This may result in river levels rising further in this area and there may be flooding to low lying land and roads. We expect the rain to continue throughout tomorrow (Friday the twenty-first of September) and for river levels to remain raised, however no flooding of properties is expected and Environment Agency staff are monitoring the situation. Take care near areas of concern and monitor your local weather conditions and the GOV.UK website. We are currently monitoring the situation.

To check the latest information for your area
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* Visit the GOV.UK website to see the current flood warnings, view river and sea levels or check the 5-day flood risk forecast: https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/target-area/033WAF315

* Or call Floodline on 0345 988 1188 using quickdial code: 208015.

* Follow @EnvAgency and #floodaware on Twitter.

* Tune into weather, news and travel bulletins on local television and radio.

Sandbags and sand are available at the Sycamore if required

Andrew Martin – Parish Council

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The drought continues

July 2018 – The Millenium pond has completely dried up, the photo compares the pond to this time last year. Not good timing for the Baby Moorhens who are currently on the pond finding what few puddles there are.

Who has picked blackberries before in July?!

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Operation FireWatch underway in the Peak District National Park

The Peak District National Park Authority has implemented Operation FireWatch in collaboration with the Moors for the Future Partnership.Staff from the National Park, partner organisations and volunteers are in place at moorland vantage points throughout the National Park to look out for fires.

The hot, dry weather means that ground conditions on the moors are extremely dry and the risk of fire is high.Residents and visitors are asked to be extra vigilant to help prevent moorland and grassland fires.

Sarah Fowler, chief executive of the Peak District National Park Authority, said: “With the hot weather set to continue over the next few days, the risk of further fires is a real concern.We have implemented Operation FireWatch to keep a close eye on conditions on the moorlands and we are urging everyone to get involved by doing everything they can to help prevent fires starting.

“We have put fire risk warning notices at moorland access points to remind everyone of the dangers but we need people enjoying the moors to observe a few basic rules:

“Leave your barbecues and fire-pits at home. Don’t drop cigarette ends or matches. Take glass bottles and litter home with you. Don’t light fires or barbecues on or near moorland. Report fires immediately to the fire service by phoning 999.”

Fire-fighters have been tackling an extensive moorland fire in the north-west of the National Park, near Stalybridge, Tameside, since Monday (25 June) – some 2,000 hectares of moorland habitat has been destroyed. Working with fire-fighting team and other partners and moorland managers, the National Park Authority is providing staff, vehicles, supplementary equipment, logistics support and local access expertise in the hard to reach places.

Sarah Fowler added: “As we have already seen this week at Tameside, in these dry conditions moorland fires spread very quickly and are devastating to the landscape, lethal for wildlife and a threat to people and homes.

“It’s breeding season for nature at this time of year on the moorlands; we have birds nesting on the ground – plover, curlew and lapwing, insects such as the bilberry bumblebee, mountain hare and other mammals, and reptiles like the tiny common lizard. Many of these species are rare or under threat – it’s vital that we all do what we can to protect them and prevent any more fires breaking out.”

The fire at Tameside is the third moorland fire in the Peak District National Park in 2018. In May, around 40 hectares of moorland were destroyed at the Goyt Valley and five hectares of moorland were damaged by fire at Big Moor, near Baslow.

The Peak District National Park Authority and Moors for the Future Partnership are working closely together with partners, including moorland owners and managers, to assess the long-term risk of wildfires on the moors as part of a shared long-term vision for resilient, sustainable moorlands in the National Park.

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